The Nine Tailors (Lord Peter Wimsey, Book 11)

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Aug 26, Maria rated it it was amazing Shelves: mystery. The mystery here is complex and interesting, and the book has plenty of Lord Peter doing terribly charming and wonderful things, which is always nice, but it is the atmospheric setting of East Anglia, used by Sayers to brilliant effect, that really made the book for me.

I nearly cried during the final climactic scene, it was that powerful. I understand some people don't like that it has so much detail on the history of the bells and change-ringing, but I found it to be just the right amount and The mystery here is complex and interesting, and the book has plenty of Lord Peter doing terribly charming and wonderful things, which is always nice, but it is the atmospheric setting of East Anglia, used by Sayers to brilliant effect, that really made the book for me.

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I understand some people don't like that it has so much detail on the history of the bells and change-ringing, but I found it to be just the right amount and detail to be interesting, not tedious, and explained well enough to not be absolutely confusing. To me, it added to the dark and brooding atmosphere of the book.

Jan 23, Alan rated it it was amazing. One of my five favorite mysteries set in England, and the cause for our touring the Fens and particularly Ely, and later King's Lynn and Norwich, on succeeding visits for a decade. Also an introduction to the Changes in English bell-ringing which we grew very familiar with in Whitchurch Canonicorum, Dorset, in ' The six bell repository of St Wlita there, old as Canterbury, but female and thought to cure eyes especially.

Two of the six went back to and Sep 27, Nandakishore Varma rated it it was amazing Shelves: mystery. Did you know that once, church bells were synchronised so that they could be tolled like a music orchestra? Yes, that is right!

The Nine Tailors: Lord Peter Wimsey Book 11 by Dorothy L. Sayers

This is one fascinating fact I got from this very unusual mystery, where a man has been murdered without using any external force. I loved this one! An engaging mystery set in Fenchurch St Paul. Wonderful characters and descriptions of the Church and the art of change ringing. Beautifully written in the Golden age of crime era. So of its time. An engrossing brilliant story. Will be looking out for more. A re- read for me! Sep 19, Laura rated it liked it Shelves: suspense-thriller , read , audio-books , fictionth-century. Dorothy L Sayers' dramatisation with Ian Carmichael.

Another interesting BBC dramatization. Free download available at Faded Page. Perhaps a Dorothy Sayers was what I needed just now, but I'm not sure this was it. For example, after a list of numbers, meaning the order in which the bells are to be rung is: Out of the hunt, middle, in and out at 5, right, middle, wrong, right, middle and into the hunt 4 times repeated. I not only didn't have a clue what any of this meant, I didn't care.

The Nine Tailors (Lord Peter Wimsey #11) by Dorothy L. Sayers_p3

But then it didn't seem as if it mattered that I understood - or maybe it did matter and I missed something along the way. The story about the murder was good enough. However, it wasn't much of a mystery - and I'm terrible at guessing these things, so it must have been as plain as the nose on my face. I do love Bunter. I think it absolutely amazing that Sayers can provide such a good characterization of someone whose primary dialog is "Very good, my lord.

It might be better than my 3 stars, but I doubt it. Some of it is the atmosphere, I think: the Englishness of this little village in the Fens, and the music of the bells woven all through the story — or, not music exactly, but the complex mathematical patterns of British bell-ringing.

And the Reverend and his household are dear characters, of course. The audio adaptation is pretty good, managing to make all the complex threads come together well. Originally posted here. Dec 24, Damaskcat rated it it was amazing Shelves: dls-challenge. Peter Wimsey — on the way to spend New Year with friends — finds himself stranded deep in the Fens in a snow storm.

The vicar of the nearby village — Fenchurch St Paul — offers him a bed for the night while his car is repaired and Wimsey finds himself part of a bell ringing marathon. When a body is found in a newly dug grave it seems natural for Wimsey to be consulted especially as no one can identify the corpse and the police are baffled. The background is atmospheric and authentic with the Fens Peter Wimsey — on the way to spend New Year with friends — finds himself stranded deep in the Fens in a snow storm.

The background is atmospheric and authentic with the Fens in all their beauty and majesty really brought to life in a way few other writers of fiction have achieved. The church bells and change ringing play a large part in this story and add to the slightly supernatural atmosphere which pervades this excellent novel. The mystery is tightly plotted and the characters believable and three dimensional. Absolutely inimitable. A somewhat long and plodding first act, but wow, what a payoff. As much literature as it is genre fiction.

Sayers is a master of the whodunnit, but at her very best, her novels encompass so much more than the whodunnit question.

In The Nine Tailors , she writes about the geography of the English fen-country and the history of churchbell-ringing nearly as capably as she does murder and sleuthing. But unlike Gaudy Night , in which the backdrop drowned the mystery, The Nine Tailors never forgets 1.

The Nine Tailors: Lord Peter Wimsey Book 11 by Dorothy L. Sayers (Paperback, 1959)

She didn't write a grand "a-ha" moment into it, but the "a-ha" that happened in my own head just about knocked me over. Oct 24, Abigail Bok rated it it was amazing. A classic. The mystery itself is complex and absorbing, but what I like best is how it is placed in a fully realized setting—the place and its inhabitants are at least as important as the mystery. I love the residents of Fenchurch St. Paul, from Mr. Venables and especially Mrs. Venables to Hilary Thorpe and all the bell ringers and the servants and everyone in between. Jul 07, Elizabeth Rowntree rated it it was amazing. My favorite of her books so far.

Apr 01, Kim rated it it was amazing Shelves: classics , sayers-dorothy , mystery , favorites , five-star-novels , read-again. Sayers, her ninth featuring Lord Peter Wimsey. It has been described as her finest literary achievement. I wonder if it really was her finest literary achievement, I've read many of her books and stories and have no idea which one is my favorite, this one is close though. It just about has to be my favorite since there are many things in it that would usually have me rolling my eyes and turning to the next page as fast as The Nine Tailors is a mystery novel by the British writer Dorothy L.

It just about has to be my favorite since there are many things in it that would usually have me rolling my eyes and turning to the next page as fast as I can. But in The Nine Tailors these little annoying things make no difference. And what are these little things you may ask? Even if you aren't asking I'm going to tell you anyway, they are bells. Oh, that's what the title is too, bells: The Nine Tailors of the book's title are taken from the old saying "Nine Tailors Make a Man", which Sayers quotes at the end of the novel.

As explained by John Shand in his Spectator article The Bellringers' Art, "'Nine Tailors' means the nine strokes which at the beginning of the toll for the dead announce to the villagers that a man is dead. A woman's death is announced with 'Six Tailors'. Hence the old saying That way they can usually figure out who it was who died.

That got me thinking of people in my life who have died, my father for instance died when he was ninety-four. Just think of how long you would have had to stand outside on the street counting the strokes until you got to the final age of my father. If we do that around here I've never noticed it and I think I would notice a bell ringing ninety-four times. There's lots of bell ringing for that reason in this book.

First we have all the ringing for poor Lady Thorpe, then later her husband Lord Henry. Then there's the guy they find dead in the a grave that he has no business being in, it happens to be Lady Thorpe's grave. The dead guy, the one we don't know could be a recent visitor to the village by the name of Driver, who comes to town, gets a job, then just disappears, or it could be the Thorpe's old butler, Deacon, he and an accomplice from London, Cranton had both been convicted of stealing an emerald necklace even though the necklace has never been found.

Deacon had escaped from prison, but died shortly afterwards by falling into a quarry, when his body was found two years later you couldn't tell who it was, but he was still wearing his prison clothes.

The Nine Tailors: Lord Peter Wimsey Book 11 (Lord Peter Wimsey Mysteries)

Hmm, I wonder if he could possibly still be alive. Whether he is or not Cranton is and he is now out of prison, and where he is no one seems to know. Maybe they just got him out of Lady Thorpe's grave, no one can tell since his face has been so smashed in he can't be identified.

Thank goodness Lord Peter is there. The reason Lord Peter is there is because he managed to get it stuck in the snow just outside of town. Paul, an interesting name for a town, until the car can be dug out of the snow bank and made to work again. And so they wind up staying with the parson, Mr.

Venables and his wife. Venables just happens to know everything there is to know, or will ever be known about bells, and he shares his knowledge with all of us. Excellent fellows and most enthusiastic. That reminds me. I was about to say that we have arranged to ring the New Year in to-night with no less," said the Rector, emphatically, "no less than fifteen thousand, eight hundred and forty Kent Treble Bob Majors. What do you think of that?

Not bad, eh? Wimsey made a rapid calculation. And, what's more, but for the little help I can give, we shall be obliged to do as well as they did, and ring the whole peal with eight ringers only. We had hoped to have twelve, but unhappily, four of our best men have been laid low by this terrible influenza, and we can get no help from Fenchurch St.

Stephen which has a ring of bells, though not equal to ours because there they have no Treble Bob ringers and confine themselves to Grandsire Triples. Or that St. Stephen have no Treble Bob ringers only Grandsire Triples? See, it's stuff like that that would normally annoy me, but it's The Nine Taylors not much can annoy me in The Nine Taylors.

Unfortunately for the poor Rector, just at this moment he receives a message that Will Thoday is too ill to help with the fifteen thousand thing, and he call's it "an irreparable disaster. Our grand scheme will have to be abandoned. Even if I were to take a bell myself, I could not possibly ring for nine hours. I am not getting younger, and besides, I have an Early Service at 8 o'clock, in addition to the New Year service which will not release me till after midnight. Ah, well! Man proposes and God disposes--unless"--the Rector turned suddenly and looked at his guest--"you were speaking just now with a good deal of feeling about Treble Bob--you are not, yourself, by any chance, a ringer?

But whether, at this time of day" "Treble Bob? But it's some time since" "It will come back to you," cried the Rector, feverishly. Half an hour with the handbells" And it does come back to him and he does take his place at the Treble Bob, I guess, and he does ring it for nine hours. I wonder what the people trying to sleep thought of all this. And then Lord Peter's car is fixed and he and Bunter leave the village and their new friends behind them, and months go by until And Lord Peter comes back and manages to figure out who it is in the grave, and what happened to Driver, and Deacon, and Cranton, and anyone else who happens to be missing that I may not be remembering at this time.

He ever figures out what happened to that long missing necklace that caused all this trouble. It's good he came back to figure it all out, I don't think I ever would have. OK, now here are some of those things irritating I just have to let go by me without any trouble at all: "The gentleman will do well enough," agreed Mr.

What 'ull we make it this time, sir? Tin tan din dan bim bam bom bo--tan tin din dan bam bim bo bom--tin tan dan din bim bam bom bo--tan tin dan din bam bim bo bom--tan dan tin bam din bo bim bom--every bell in her place striking tuneably, hunting up, hunting down, dodging, snapping, laying her blows behind, making her thirds and fourths, working down to lead the dance again. Call her: 1st Half Out of the hunt, middle, in and out at 5, right, middle, wrong, right, middle and into the hunt 4 times repeated.

The last call in each half is a single; Holt's Single must be used in ringing this peal. The voice of the bells of Fenchurch St. Paul: Gaude, Gaudy, Domini in laude. Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth. From Jericho to John a-Groate there is no bell can better my note. Jubilate Deo. Nunc Dimittis, Domine. Abbot Thomas set me here and bad me ring both loud and clear. Paul is my name, honour that same. Nine Tailors Make a Man. I love this book, tin, tan, din, dan, and all.

Happy reading. Feb 03, Fiona rated it liked it Shelves: crime-fiction. What with the toffs fah-fahing: " I'd heard great things about this book but I'm What with the toffs fah-fahing: " I'd heard great things about this book but I'm not overly fond of sleuthing as a form of detective novel so I didn't love it. I enjoyed the writing, the banter between the characters, learning about the complex art of bell ringing, and the evocative portrayal of the East Anglian countryside - Fenchurch St Paul reminded me of Walpole St Peter, 'The Queen of the Marshland'.

I can't say as I'll be lookin' to read any more Lord Peter Wimsey novels soon though, old bean. King Vi Readers also enjoyed. About Dorothy L. Dorothy Leigh Sayers was a renowned British author, translator, student of classical and modern languages, and Christian humanist. However, Sayers herself considered her translation of Dante's Divina Co Dorothy Leigh Sayers was a renowned British author, translator, student of classical and modern languages, and Christian humanist.

However, Sayers herself considered her translation of Dante's Divina Commedia to be her best work. She is also known for her plays and essays. The Cornish Coast Murder. John Bude. The Big Sleep. Raymond Chandler. Fell Murder. The Sentence is Death. Anthony Horowitz. Sherlock Holmes. Jennifer Kasius. Maigret and the Wine Merchant. Paperback edition. Comment 0. Your review has been submitted successfully. Not registered? Forgotten password Please enter your email address below and we'll send you a link to reset your password.

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The Nine Tailors Lord Peter Wimsey Book 11 by Dorothy L. Sayers 9781473621398

If this item isn't available to be reserved nearby, add the item to your basket instead and select 'Deliver to my local shop' at the checkout, to be able to collect it from there at a later date. Brand new: lowest price The lowest-priced brand-new, unused, unopened, undamaged item in its original packaging where packaging is applicable. Dorothy L Sayers was born in Oxford in , and was both a classical scholar and a graduate in modern languages.

She died in Nine Tailors by Dorothy L. Author Dorothy L. Title Nine Tailors. See details. Buy It Now. Add to cart. Be the first to write a review About this product. Show More Show Less. No ratings or reviews yet.

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